Research Library

Providing current research to our members is a strategic priority for the Alliance. We deliver access to valuable resources and anaylsis of the latest research findings relevant to educators of girls. Subscription-only academic research articles, as well as open access articles and reports by governments, universities and major organisations are summarised for members, highlighting themes and topics of particular relevance to the education of girls, including academic performance, mental health, leadership, neuroscience, single-sex education, STEM, wellbeing, and work and careers.

With more than 500 research abstracts, including over 160 related to single-sex education, many of which summarise research from subscription-only academic journals, the Alliance Research Library provides an unparalleled source of information on single-sex education for girls.

Library access and membership:

Free library membership and access is available for all staff of Alliance member schools, simply complete the access request form to receive your personalised login.

Annual library subscription for non-Alliance members costs AUD550

$550.00BUY

For more information or member access, please contact Loren Bridge (t) +61 7 5521 0749 (e) [email protected]

Upper secondary female students at risk of ill-health from inactivity after lockdown (Hurter et al., 2022)

COVID-19 impacted students’ levels of physical activity, regardless of gender. After returning to school following extended periods of lockdown, “girls engaged in significantly less moderate-to-vigorous” physical activity after returning to school when compared to boys. Researchers have identified upper secondary school female students as an at-risk group, requiring ‘specific COVID-recovery intervention’.

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Role models and women in leadership: Helping or hindering girls’ ambitions? (Paule and Yelin, 2022)

Low numbers of women in key leadership roles have been popularly addressed through interventions that “stimulate girls’ leadership aspirations through the public pedagogy of role models”. Recent research suggests that existing approaches which use celebrities and women in leadership positions as role models do not challenge the “traditionally individualist, authoritarian and masculine” themes present in frameworks of leadership.

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Interventions for girls’ physical activity: New research, benefits, and risks of over-focussing on girls (Pell et al., 2022)

Research in Wales has suggested that the physical activity of girls can decline more than that of boys as they reach adolescence. A ‘primary school-based community linked role-model programme’ draws on evidence that suggests role models could hold a crucial role as an inspiring influence to encourage girls to be (and remain) physically active.

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New approaches to monitoring girls’ responses to preventative mental health programs in schools (Bossenbroek et al., 2022)

Nuanced understanding of cognitive behavioural interventions and shift away from “traditional approaches” deliver better interventions to female school students experiencing sub-clinical depression. Researchers say tailor treatment to diagnoses and severity of symptoms, citing those students who require more sustained treatment, and also those who spontaneously recover as evidence for the inappropriateness of a one-size-fits-all approach.

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Self-estimated intelligence: Explaining male hubris, female humility (Reilly et al., 2022)

New Australian research may explain the practical nuances of male hubris, female humility effect. While genders are “equal in measured intelligence” women “systematically” underrate their IQ, while males overinflate theirs. There is no single cause for the male hubris, female humility effect, but a range of social conditioning factors, including the socio-cultural transmission of gender stereotypes.

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Increasing girls’ engagement with physical education classes: Focus on the ‘peer-created’ climate rather than ‘teacher-created’ climates to motivate girls (Tidmarsh et al., 2022)

A UK-based research team investigated ways to improve girls’ engagement in physical education (PE) classes. After discovering several barriers to girls’ participation and engagement, such as and gender stereotypes and self-comparisons to male students, body image concerns, and negative experiences in PE, researchers concluded programming does not always lead to results in practice. They concluded that the way in which peers regulate ‘the motivational climate is more significant that ‘teacher-created’ climates to motivate girls into sport.

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Construction has an image problem: Why female secondary students choose not to pursue career opportunities in construction (Carnemolla & Galea, 2021)

A recent study offers new insight into why more Australian female high school students are not motivated to pursue careers in construction. Researchers concluded that the construction sector needs to “reposition itself” as “inclusive” and that schools need to communicate this “potential and diversity” through “diverse role models and champions” (p. 834).

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Report finds sex-based bullying is rife: improved consent education and adult response to incidents vital to combat sexism in schools (Connolly, 2022)

According to a recent report released by Helen Connolly, South Australia’s (SA) Commissioner for Children and Young People, sexism and stereotyping are now considered a “normal part of school culture” with incidents “generally not reported due to a belief that nothing can or will be done about it” (Connolly, 2022, p. 18).

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Addressing gender inequity in STEM: Lessons from 20 years of F-12 engineering education research (Sneider & Ravel, 2021)

Sneider and Ravel (2021, p. 63) review the myriad of studies targeting issues facing marginalised groups in STEM, including girls and young women. The authors presented an encouraging interpretation of 263 research studies, showing that “multiple methods have successfully addressed a major social inequity: improving attitudes, STEM skills, and career aspirations of girls”.

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