New Research

Providing current research to our members is a strategic priority for the Alliance. We deliver access to valuable resources and anaylsis of the latest research findings relevant to educators of girls. If you have any suggestions for research topics or feedback on our research collateral, please contact our Research Officer, Jan Richardson (e) [email protected].

Access to some areas listed below is restricted to member schools. For more information or member access, please contact Loren Bridge (t) +61 7 55210749 (e) [email protected].


Ideal standards for school policy on student self-harm (Matthews et al., 2021)

September 2021

An Australian study by researchers from Wollongong University outlines the key points that will help inform the development of evidence-based guidelines for schools seeking to better respond to the rising incidence of student self-harm (Matthews, Townsend, Gray & Grenyer, 2021, pp. 187-188). Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) has recently been included as…

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Alliance Research Series: Girls’ learning and wellbeing

August 2021

This webinar series showcases cutting-edge research relevant to girls’ education. It is designed for educators looking to stay on top of emerging trends and issues in girls’ learning and wellbeing. Each of the webinars features a unique research project and shares the findings, recommendations and experiences of the researcher. The projects cover academic buoyancy, culturally sensitive intervention for girls at risk, and feedback strategies to help girls move forward, thrive and grow. Three of the projects were conducted in girls’ schools. NON-MEMBER access to the series can be purchased for $154 (AUD inc GST) on our Events page.

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Mental toughness of girls at UK single-sex and co-educational schools (AQR International, 2021)

August 2021

Research from the United Kingdom indicates that girls who attend single-sex girls’ schools are generally more confident and more emotionally in control than girls attending state and independent co-educational schools. AQR International’s ‘mental toughness’ research has also found that the pandemic may have exacerbated gaps and differences that already exist…

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The relationship between classroom type (single-sex or mixed-sex) and the academic achievement of girls and boys in maths (Skital & Tîru, 2021)

August 2021

An Israeli study comparing the maths achievement of male and female students in single-sex and mixed-sex classes in primary and middle school found that classroom type does not affect boys, but it does have a significant effect on girls’ achievement, particularly for girls in primary school (Skital & Tîru, 2021,…

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Understanding the motivational profiles of high-ability female students (Kong & Liu, 2020)

August 2021

A study investigating the motivational profiles of high-ability students attending a girls’ secondary school in Singapore has found three clusters of girls with distinct motivational profiles which differ significantly in terms of self-efficacy, intrinsic task value, effort, and enjoyment in learning. Highly motivated, high-ability girls were found to be the…

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Parental aspirations and secondary school choice in Australia (Yu, 2021)

July 2021

A South Australian study has examined secondary school choice decisions by parents of Year 6 students, finding that parents’ school choice is primarily based on two factors: perceptions of school quality and aspirations for their children. Sing Chee (Esther) Yu found that middle-class parents “are highly motivated by their aspirations…

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Lean in? The role of single-sex schools in the gendering of confidence in high school adolescents (Fitzsimmons, Yates & Callan, 2021)

July 2021

An Australian study finding that the confidence of girls and boys attending single-sex schools is equal, despite established research finding that girls and women are less confident than boys and men in all situations, has been published in the Australian Journal of Career Development. University of Queensland academics Terrance Fitzsimmons,…

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