New Research

Providing current research to our members is a strategic priority for the Alliance. We deliver access to valuable resources and anaylsis of the latest research findings relevant to educators of girls. If you have any suggestions for research topics or feedback on our research collateral, please contact our Research Officer, Jan Richardson (e) [email protected].

Access to some areas listed below is restricted to member schools. For more information or member access, please contact Loren Bridge (t) +61 7 55210749 (e) [email protected].


Girls helping girls: The impact of female peers on grades and educational choices (Schøne et al., 2017)

August 2019

Norwegian researchers have found that a higher proportion of female peers in lower secondary classes increases girls’ maths grades and the likelihood that they will choose STEM-based courses in upper secondary school. However, for boys, a higher proportion of girls in classes leads to lower science grades and a higher…

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Do disordered eating behaviours in girls vary by school characteristics? (Bould et al., 2018)

July 2019

Using longitudinal data from the UK, researchers have investigated whether there is a link between disordered eating behaviours (binge eating, purging, fasting, restrictive eating, and fear of weight gain) and body dissatisfaction clusters in particular schools or by school type. The researchers found no evidence of body dissatisfaction clustering by…

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Tracking gender stereotypes in kindergarten (Meland & Kaltvedt, 2019)

July 2019

Norwegian researchers have found that kindergarten staff contribute to upholding traditional gender stereotypes, treating girls and boys differently, despite the Norwegian Gender Equality Act requiring kindergartens and schools to focus on equality and avoid gender stereotyping. In contrast, the study found that kindergarten-age girls and boys challenge prevailing gender structures…

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Position paper for guiding response to nonsuicidal self-injury in schools (Hasking et al., 2016)

July 2019

A position paper by international experts in nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), including lead author Penelope Hasking from Curtin University (WA), sets out best-practice guidelines for addressing NSSI in schools. The position paper also outlines the importance of a school protocol, the key features that all school protocols should contain, and how…

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Having it all? Adolescent girls’ perceptions of stress in girls’ schools (Spencer et al., 2018)

July 2019

An American study led by Renée Spencer of Boston University has investigated the relationship between affluence, single-sex schooling and psychosocial distress among adolescent girls. Research has suggested that girls at all-girl schools enjoy advantages over co-educated girls in terms of greater support from teachers and peers (Holmgren, 2014) and protective…

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Social-emotional functioning in kindergarten and early-onset mental health conditions (Thomson et al., 2019)

July 2019

A Canadian study has found that just over 40% of children enter school with vulnerabilities in social-emotional functioning that are associated with early-onset mental health conditions. Researchers examined the social-emotional functioning profiles of over 34,000 children attending kindergarten (age 5) and to what extent they are related to early-onset mental…

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Motivation and engagement with physics: Girls in single-sex and co-educational classrooms (Abraham & Barker, 2018)

June 2019

An Australian study examining girls’ motivation and engagement in Year 11 physics in single-sex and co-educational schools has found that girls displayed high confidence levels in their ability to do physics and its usefulness for their future. The girls’ responses also indicated that they enjoyed studying physics, but some differences…

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