2017

Providing current research to our members is a strategic priority for the Alliance. We deliver access to valuable resources and anaylsis of the latest research findings relevant to educators of girls. Academic research and reports by governments, universities and major organisations are summarised for members, highlighting themes and topics of particular relevance to the education of girls, including: academic performance, mental health, leadership, neuroscience, single-sex education, STEM, wellbeing, and work and careers.

Access is restricted to member schools. For more information or member access, please contact Loren Bridge (t) +61 7 5521 0749 (e) [email protected]

Happiness and depression in bullied and cyberbullied 12-year-olds (Uusitalo-Malmivaara & Lehto, 2016)

A study of bullying and cyberbullying of 12-year-old students in Finland has found that traditional bullying and cyberbullying are related to a decrease in all measures of psychological wellbeing. In particular, being a being a victim of bullying or cyberbullying is associated with depression, especially for victims who experience both…
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Teachers’ subject recommendations influenced by maths/language gender stereotypes (Nürnburger et al., 2016)

A joint German-Norwegian study has found that teachers in Germany are more likely to recommend that boys attend a maths/science-oriented high school and girls a language-oriented high school. The researchers were able to predict the likelihood of this happening by examining the teachers’ beliefs in implicit maths-language gender stereotypes and…
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The human brain mosaic (Joel et al., 2015)

In a landmark study, Israeli, German and Swiss researchers have found that “human brains cannot be categorized into two distinct classes” of male and female. Rather, the majority of brains are comprised of a unique “mosaic” of male and female features, while a minority (between 0% and 10%) possess only…
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The ethics and science of the gendered toy marketing debate (Fine & Rush, 2016)

Researchers Cordelia Fine and Emma Rush examine the gendered marketing of children’s toys, asking whether gendered marketing influences children’s toy preferences or simply reflects boys’ and girls’ fundamentally different interests. In addition, they examine the effects of gendered toy marketing and its relationship to gender stereotyping and unconscious bias experienced…
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Brain plasticity and the rigid problem of ‘hardwired’ brain differences (Fine et al., 2013)

This 2013 article by four leading academics asks why “popular understanding of female-male differences is still based on rigid models of development, even though contemporary development sciences emphasize brain plasticity?” Academic psychologist Cordelia Fine (Melbourne University), sociomedical scientist Rebecca Jordan-Young (Columbia University), academic psychologist Anelis Kaiser (University of Bern, Switzerland)…
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