2017

Providing current research to our members is a strategic priority for the Alliance. We deliver access to valuable resources and anaylsis of the latest research findings relevant to educators of girls. Academic research and reports by governments, universities and major organisations are summarised for members, highlighting themes and topics of particular relevance to the education of girls, including: academic performance, mental health, leadership, neuroscience, single-sex education, STEM, wellbeing, and work and careers.

Access is restricted to member schools. For more information or member access, please contact Loren Bridge (t) +61 7 5521 0749 (e) [email protected]

Why are single-sex schools successful? (Dustmann et al., 2017)

A study led by Christian Dustmann, Professor of Economics at University College London, has found that converting educational environments from single-sex to co-ed leads to falling academic results for both boys and girls. For girls it is the presence of boys within their classrooms that appears to be the main…
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Innovation and creativity: Workforce for the new economy (2017)

A report on innovation and creativity by an Australian Parliamentary Committee states that the workforce of the future is dependent on students acquiring a solid STEM education, beginning in primary school. It is of concern, therefore, that the majority of primary school teachers have no educational background in STEM, while…
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Exploring single-sex learning as a remedy for social anxieties in female middle school students (Hart, 2016)

Research undertaken by American researcher, Laura Hart, has found that “participation in single-sex programs can help in easing social anxieties girls may experience while in middle school”. Sixth grade girls placed in a single-sex classroom “found the setting to be more supportive than a mixed-sex classroom”. In addition, Hart found…
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Helicopter parenting, autonomy, mental health and wellbeing in female students (Kouros et al., 2017)

An American study has found that helicopter parenting predicts lower levels of wellbeing for female students, but not males, possibly because parents use more controlling behaviours and less autonomy-granting behaviours with their daughters compared with their sons. The study authors, who examined mental health, dysphoria, social anxiety and general wellbeing…
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Talent development and gifted education: Outcomes from a summit of international researchers (Subotnik et al., 2017)

In 2016, leading researchers in talent development and giftedness participated in the inaugural American European Research Summit to examine current research in this field. A key finding of the summit was the existence of a “clear and persistent disconnect” between the complexities of modern scientific conceptions of giftedness and the…
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