2014

Providing current research to our members is a strategic priority for the Alliance. We deliver access to valuable resources and anaylsis of the latest research findings relevant to educators of girls. Subscription-only academic research articles, as well as open access articles and reports by governments, universities and major organisations are summarised for members, highlighting themes and topics of particular relevance to the education of girls, including academic performance, mental health, leadership, neuroscience, single-sex education, STEM, wellbeing, and work and careers.

With more than 500 research abstracts, including over 160 related to single-sex education, many of which summarise research from subscription-only academic journals, the Alliance Research Library provides an unparalleled source of information on single-sex education for girls.

Library access and membership:

Free library membership and access is available for all staff of Alliance member schools, simply complete the access request form to receive your personalised login.

Annual library subscription for non-Alliance members costs AUD550

$550.00BUY

For more information or member access, please contact Loren Bridge (t) +61 7 5521 0749 (e) [email protected]

Who attends a women’s college? (Sax, 2014)

A study by UCLA Professor Linda Sax has found evidence of the positive outcomes of attending a women’s college, including increased academic self-confidence and engagement; higher educational and career aspirations; deeper community orientation and civic engagement; and greater political involvement (pp. ix-xi). The report details insights obtained from survey research…

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Positive effects of single-sex schooling (Lu & Rickard, 2014)

A 2014 report by Dr Lucy Lu and Karen Rickard for the NSW Centre for Education Statistics and Evaluation, examining numeracy and literacy (NAPLAN) data for junior secondary students and tertiary entrance scores (TES) for senior secondary students, “confirmed the positive effects of single-sex schooling” in the NSW government system, where there are…

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Academic engagement of females from single-sex and coeducational secondary schools (Sax, Riggers & Eagan, 2013)

Sax, Riggers and Eagan (2013) explored whether levels of academic engagement varied between girls from different educational settings. Academic engagement “can be broadly understood as physical and intellectual participation in activities related to school and is associated with social and cognitive development,” school attendance and school graduation (p. 3). The…

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Steeped in Learning: The student experience at girls’ schools in the United States (Holmgren, 2014)

A 2014 report prepared for the National Coalition of Girls’ Schools (NCGS) found that girls at NCGS schools have “higher aspirations”, “greater motivation” and are “challenged to achieve more than their female peers” at co-ed independent and public schools (Holmgren, 2014, pp. 2-3). In particular: 98.7% of girls attending girls’ schools belonging to the…

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